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Queens Man Who Shot His Then-Girlfriend While She Was in Bed Sentenced to 18 Years in Prison for Attempted Murder

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Jan. 20, 2022 By Christian Murray

A Far Rockaway man was sentenced today to nearly two decades in prison for attempting to kill his then-girlfriend in January 2019 while she lay in bed.

Vernon Jeffers, 44, was sentenced to 18 years in prison after pleading guilty on Nov. 9 to attempted murder. He was also sentenced to five year’s post release supervision.

According to the charges, Jeffers shot his then-girlfriend twice at around 2 a.m. on Jan. 19, 2019, while she was in bed in her South Ozone Park apartment. He then fled the scene.

“This defendant was sentenced for using a deadly firearm to twice shoot his then-girlfriend in the chest while she was helpless in bed,” said Queens District Attorney Melinda Katz. “Luckily, she survived but continues to deal with the burden of her physical and psychological injuries.”

The woman, who was 48 years old at the time of the shooting, was able to call 911 from her 117th Street apartment and report that she had been shot by her boyfriend. Jeffers was apprehended three days later.

The victim required surgery to treat her injuries, which included a lacerated liver. A bullet remains lodged near her spine, according to authorities.

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